Session

Novel models for studying prostate cancer biology

Poster Session 12

  • Location:
    Room Vienna (Hall B2, level 0)
  • Chairs:
     M. Puhr, Innsbruck (AT)
     J.A. Schalken, Nijmegen (NL)
     G. Van Der Pluijm, Leiden (NL)
  • Aims and objectives of this session

    Novel animal and cellular models have been extensively used in prostate cancer research. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate cancer, it is particularly important to demonstrate applicability of these novel models to address clinically relevant questions. Mediators of stromal epithelial interactions and respective signaling pathways will be discussed.

  • Poster viewing of 20 minutes. Presentations will take place on stage. Standard presentations are 2 minutes in length, followed by 2 minutes for discussion.
Introduction
 G. Van Der Pluijm, Leiden (NL)
136
Periprostatic adipose tissue acts as a driving force for the local invasion of prostate cancer in obesity: Role of the CCR3/CCL7 axis

By: Roumiguie M.1, Laurent V.2, Toulet A.2, Zaidi F.3, Valet P.4, Mazerolles C.3, Malavaud B.1, Muller C.2

Institutes: 1Institut Universitaire Du Cancer, Dept. of Urology, Toulouse, France, 2Institut De Pharmacologie Et Biologie Structurale Du CNRS, Dept. of Oncology, Toulouse, France, 3Institut Universitaire Du Cancer, Dept. of Pathology, Toulouse, France, 4INSERM, U1048, Toulouse, France

137
The neurosteroidogenic potential of metastatic prostate cancer cell lines under starvation treatment with abiraterone

By: Gomes De Mello Martins A.G.1, Allegretta G.1, Haupenthal J.1, Eberhard J.1, Van Der Zee J.2, Unteregger G.2, Stöckle M.2, Junker K.2, Hartmann R.W.1, Ohlmann C-H.2

Institutes: 1Helmholtz Institute For Pharmaceutical Research Saarland, Dept. of Drug Design and Optimization, Saarbrücken, Germany, 2Saarland University Medical Center, Dept. of Urology, Homburg-Saar, Germany

138
Exploring a novel therapeutic target for neuroendocrine prostate cancer using a xenograft model of trans-differentiation

By: Akamatsu S.1, Wyatt A.2, Lin D.2, Lysakowski S.2, Zhang F.2, Kawai Y.2, Fazli L.2, Ogawa O.1, Lotan T.3, Rubin M.4, Beltran H.5, Zoubeidi A.2, Wang Y.2, Gleave M.2, Collins C.2

Institutes: 1Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Dept. of Urology, Kyoto, Japan, 2Vancouver Prostate Centre, Dept. of Urologic Sciences, Vancouver, Canada, 3Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Dept. of Pathology, Baltimore, United States of America, 4Weil Cornell Medical College, Dept. of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, New York, United States of America, 5Weil Cornell Medical College, Dept. of Medicine, New York, United States of America

139
Prostate cancer xenograft in vitro culture using organoid technology

By: Nicholson C.2, Williams E.2, Vela I.1

Institutes: 1Princess Alexandra Hospital/Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre-Queensland, Dept. of Urology, Woolloongabba, Australia, 2Queensland University of Technology, Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre – Queensland, Woolloongabba, Australia

140
Orthotopic xenografts using LuCaP136 spheroid cultures provide a versatile preclinical model of prostate cancer

By: Linxweiler J.1, Körbel C.2, Valta M.3, Müller A.4, Junker K.1, Stöckle M.1, Menger M.D.2, Peehl D.M.5, Saar M.1

Institutes: 1Saarland University Medical Center, Dept. of Urology, Homburg/Saar, Germany, 2Saarland University Medical Center, Dept. of Clinical-Experimental Surgery, Homburg/Saar, Germany, 3Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Dept. of Medicine, Turku, Finland, 4Saarland University Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Homburg/Saar, Germany, 5Stanford University School of Medicine, Dept. of Urology, Stanford, United States of America

141
Development of prostate intra-epithelial neoplasia in an aging series of PolgA mutator mice suggests a role for mitochondrial DNA mutations in prostate carcinogenesis

By: Sachdeva A.1, El-Sherif A.2, Turnbull D.3, Greaves L.3, Heer R.1

Institutes: 1Newcastle University, Northern Institute of Cancer Research, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom, 2Newcastle-Upon-Tyne NHS Foundation Trust, Dept. of Histopathology, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom, 3Newcastle University, Wellcome Trust Centre For Mitochondrial Research, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom

142
Next generation sequencing to determine the clonal origin of lymph node metastasis in multifocal prostate cancer: Defining the biologically dominant nodule

By: Salami S.1, Hovelson D.2, Mathieu R.3, Susani M.4, Rioux-Leclercq N.5, Tracey J.1, Shariat S.3, Tomlins S.2, Palapattu G.1

Institutes: 1University of Michigan, Dept. of Urology, Ann Arbor, United States of America, 2University of Michigan, Dept. of Pathology, Ann Arbor, United States of America, 3Medical University Vienna, Dept. of Urology, Vienna, Austria, 4Medical University Vienna, Dept. of Pathology, Vienna, Austria, 5Rennes University Hospital, Dept. of Pathology, Rennes, France

143
MED15 overexpression arises during androgen deprivation therapy via PI3K/mTOR signaling

By: Offermann A.1, Shaikhibrahim Z.1, Syring I.2, Vogel W.1, Ruiz C.3, Zellweger T.4, Rentsch C.A.5, Bubendorf L.3, Perner S.1

Institutes: 1University Hospital of Luebeck and Leibniz Research Center Borstel, Dept. of Pathology, Lübeck, Germany, 2University Hospital of Bonn, Dept. of Urology and Pediatric Urology, Bonn, Germany, 3University Hospital Basel, Institute for Pathology, Basel, Switzerland, 4St. Claraspital Basel, Dept. of Urology, Basel, Switzerland, 5University Hospital Basel, Dept. of Urology, Basel, Switzerland

144
Expression of glucocorticoid receptors, androgen receptors and its splice variants in prostate cancer: Comparison between hormone dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer

By: Shim M.1, Choi S.K.2, Kim Y.2, Ahn T.Y.2, Ahn H.2

Institutes: 1Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Dept. of Urology, Anyang-Si, South Korea, 2Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Dept. of Urology, Seoul, South Korea

145
Tumour-stromal architecture influences prognosis and response to docetaxel in prostate cancer

By: Bokobza S.2, Hiew K.1, Huby R.2, Davies E.2, Brown M.1, Barry S.2, Davies B.2, Elliott T.3, Clarke N.4, Smith N.2

Institutes: 1Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute, The University of Manchester, Genito Urinary Cancer Research Group, Manchester, United Kingdom, 2AstraZeneca, R & D, Oncology IMed, Macclesfield, United Kingdom, 3Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Dept. of Oncology, Manchester, United Kingdom, 4Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Dept. of Urology, Manchester, United Kingdom

146
Patient-derived three-dimensional spheroid cultures provide an innovative tool for comprehensive in-vitro studies on organ-confined prostate cancer

By: Saar M.1, Linxweiler J.1, Muhs S.1, Ohlmann C.H.1, Jung V.1, Pryalukhin A.2, Junker K.1, Stöckle M.1

Institutes: 1Saarland University Medical Center, Dept. of Urology and Pediatric Urology, Homburg/Saar, Germany, 2Saarland University Medical Center, Dept. of Pathology, Homburg/Saar, Germany

147
The C-Myc and TNFα/NF-kB pathways are critically involved in the regulatory network between the undifferentiated prostate basal stem cell state and the more differentiated luminal prostate epithelial cells

By: Höfner T.1, Klein C.2, Eisen C.2, Rigo-Watermeier T.2, Haferkamp A.3, Trumpp A.2, Sprick M.2

Institutes: 1University Hospital Frankfurt, Heidelberg Institute for Stem Cell Research and Experimental Medicine (HI-STEM), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Frankfurt am Main, Germany, 2German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg Institute for Stem Cell Research and Experimental Medicine (HI-STEM), Heidelberg, Germany, 3University Hospital Frankfurt, Dept. of Urology, Frankfurt am Main, Germany